Monday, May 20, 2013

What I've been up to lately

Things have been busy in the last month or so and I felt like sharing what I've been up to. Most of it revolves around software testing:

April saw the start of Dan Ariely’s A Beginners Guide to Irrational Behavior class on coursera. I knew I had the BBST course coming up so I didn't commit much time to the class other than watching the video lectures and doing the video quizzes. There are many aspects of irrational behavior that affect what we do in software development and testing – I’d like to write a more in-depth article about that in the future.

On the 14th of April I started the BBST Test Design course and completed it on May 8th. For those who have never taken a BBST class before they are incredibly intense month long courses. The course breaks a single calendar week into 2 class weeks – one week with 4 days, and a shorter week with 3 days and each week requires about 10-15 hours of work in order to do the readings, labs and work on the exam. The class is done but I still don’t know if I've passed; regardless I learned a lot.

On April 19th I joined the NRG Global Online test competition. My last post was a reflection on how well I thought I did and despite my low perception of how I did my team ended up winning part of the competition.

I went to STPcon 2013 at the end of April in San Diego where I met up with a few Miagi-Do’ers, met some other testers I’d heard from in the twitter-verse or blog-o-sphere and learned a few things. I’m planning to write an experience report and post it either here or on the newly formed Miagi-Do blog. I think it might apply a little more here but I don’t know how it will turn out because I haven’t written it.

Tuesday, May 7, 2013

NRG Global Test Competition Retrospective

Roughly two and a half weeks ago I competed in the first NRG Global Test Competition. The idea behind the competition was simple: get a bunch of people/ teams together to test a few products, split the competition into two days, one with functional testing and another with performance testing, and based on the reports submitted judges would award points and announce winners. The full details are available here and here.

This was the first online testing competition I'd tried but thanks to my experiences with testing challenges and rapid testing online I knew I'd have fun once I got past the quirks. By quirks I mean it can take time to get comfortable with the discussion format, figure out how to ask questions, how best to communicate with my fellow team members, etc. The competition took place at 10 am Eastern which sucks if you live on the west coast and have to wake up before 7 am like I did. It was all for fun anyways.

For as early in the morning and as new as the competition was I think I did reasonable. Not great, not even good, but reasonable. I think the best way to phrase it is: I'm not happy with my work. (I might be overly critical here but still.) Now we only had 3 hours from introduction of the products under test, to learn the product, ask questions of the "owner", test it, ask more questions, file bugs and write a report. Yet when I think back at what we turned in I'm not happy with it. Let me explain.

My team member and I barely communicated with one another. We were using Skype but we didn't do much planning ahead of time (not like we could have because nothing was public) so when it came time for the competition it was a simple "hi", "what are you working on" and "I'll look at x". That was it. We each went to different applications. Thinking back on it now I think we would have done much better if we were on the same application, talking to one other about what we were seeing. My experience has been any collaboration no matter how small results in finding and learning amazing things.